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Saturday, October 7, 2017

Yonka’s GOMMAGE 303—DISCONTINUED!!!

Im stunned. Im in a state of shock. Yonka has suddenly discontinued Gommage 303.

I can’t say I’m totally surprised, although I am extremely disappointed. Last year when I had a private training at my salon, the Yonka rep discussed upcoming changes with the product line. She did mention the possibility of going down to one gommage, but I guess I didn’t really think it would happen. But it has. Yonka now only has one gommage product available: Gommage 305With that said: I love Gommage 305. It certainly doesn’t have the citrus aromatics of Gommage 303, but I love it just the same.

A few years back Yonka changed the formulas for many of their products, taking out parabens and making overall changes to many of the ingredient lists. Unfortunately, 303 got hit with a major change that, for me as an aesthetician, was not only unfortunate but left me not wanting to use this citrus exfoliator on my clients. Gommage 303 quite simply didn’t gommage well. In treatment I had to use 2x the normal amount (and I use a lot of gommage in every facial). It didn’t peel off well and at home when I’d use it, I had to rub too hard to get any kind of a peel.

So really, this change doesn’t affect me personally. I didn’t love 303 anymore (after the ingredient changes) and I pretty much stopped using it in treatment. However Yonka headquarters didn’t highlight this change like I think they should have, and I wasn’t given time to purchase stock of this gommage for my clients who absolutely love it. There just wasn’t enough advanced notice to give my clients time to prepare for this large change in all of their skin care routines. Some—really most—of the products Yonka has chosen to discontinue lately haven’t affected too many people, although Creme PS was another biggie; discontinuing Gommage 303 is a big deal for many who love this gommage and that is a lot of people.

So for a large percentage of my clients this change will be a shock. Many of you just didn’t like the pungent smell of 305, preferring the citrus aromas of 303. Like Phyto 52, 305 has a rosemary-type scent, although there isn’t any rosemary in this gommage. Borneol, a camphor derivative, gives 305 a more earthy aromatic. I personally love it, some of you don’t. But please PLEASE don’t let this stop you from using gommage! It is essential to your routine and without it your skin will suffer.

The two gommages where originally combined into one blog post. I’ve taken all of 303 out and 305 stands alone in a new, solo article still published May 1, 2016, like the original. I will leave for posterity and happy memories the following details about our beloved Gommage 303. There are also links at the bottom of this page to articles I have written about what the gommage is and important instructions on how to use it.

So long, trusted friend. After our 32 years together, it’s time to say goodbye. Thank you for all the good work you’ve done for all of these many years!


GOMMAGE 303 says on the packaging its for a normal to oily skin type. I will go a bit further and say that 303, because of its citrus nature, is best for ANY skin type that is not sensitive to citrus. Simply putGommage 303 is for non-sensitive skin. Because of the fruity aromatic, some people who have true-dry (oil-dry) skin may prefer this product over 305simply due to the scent. Personally, I love the aromatic of Gommage 305, but my experience as an aesthetician is it isnt for everyone. Dont let the label on this product keep you from trying it, even if you dont have normal to oily skin. 

I use both 303 and 305 (personally and on most of my clients in the treatment room) and many of my clients do too. With essential oils of orange, sweet lime, and lemon, as long as your skin isnt sensitive to citrus, Gommage 303 is heavenlynot just because it makes your skin feel smooth, soft, and well-exfoliated but also because of the lovely fruit aromatics.

Essential ingredients:
  • Carob, brown algae derivatives—exfoliating, hydrating 
  • Essential oils of orange, lemon, lime—astringent, balancing 
  • Lemon extract rich in vitamin C—lightening, antioxidant 
  • Plant glycerin—hydrating

For more information, see:

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Oils in your skin care products

There is a misconception that oil in products (moisturizers) is a bad thing. I disagree. Oil-free products have to add fillers and emollients in order to make their product smooth and spreadable. If a product isn’t using oil(s), it is probably using synthetic, nonnutritive ingredients to replace natural oils.

High-quality, vegetal (vegetable) oils are not detrimental to an oilier skin type; petroleum derived oils, like mineral oil, probably are. Please do not shy away from using “oil” in your moisturizers if you have oily or normal to oily/combination skin. If the product is made for your skin type, you should be fine—as long as it is a quality product. As I've talked about in this blog, cheaper products with cheap ingredients (like mineral oil) are probably not going to work well if you have problem skin.

Here is a short list of oils that can be found in moisturizers. These oils (vegetable and other) are preferable to mineral oil or petroleum derived ingredients. This list is not every oil that is available, but it gives you something to compare with the products you are using. Note: termed vegetable oils, most of the following come from nuts and seeds:
  • Almond Oil, Sweet Almond Oil
  • Castor Oil
  • Coconut Oil, Hydrogenated Coconut Oil
  • Corn Oil
  • Olive Oil
  • Palm Kernel Oil, Hydrogenated Palm Kernel Oil
  • Pumpkin Seed Oil
  • Shea Butter
  • Soybean Oil
  • Sunflower Seed Oil
  • Wheat Germ Oil

Just because you are using a moisturizer with one or more of these oils in it doesn’t mean it will turn out to be a great product for you. But if you find your creams have mineral oil or petroleum listed as the main ingredient, I would opt for a moisturizer that contained more organic, “natural” ingredients and vegetable oils such as those in this list.

Please note: If you have internal allergies (food allergies) to any of the above, more than likely they will not make good ingredients in a topical skin care product—for you.

For more information, see: